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20121027
20121104
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remarks on foreign policy, particularly the challenges facing the new egyptian government in the foreign policy and region security realm, but i can set the concept of talking a little bit about domestic policy. and here, let me just start off by what seems to be a paradoxical situation, when assessing egypt's domestic landscape. because i'm the one hand, on the level of politics we have truly momentous change in egypt. however, on the level of policy, i would argue that we have much more continuity than change. on the level of politics, the election of president mohamed morsi was truly a landmark event in egypt's political history. he was the first civilian elected to the office of the presidency in egypt. he is also the first islamist to be elected as head of state in any arab country in free and fair elections. and that the islamist movement in question of course is the most impressive by far, the largest and most well-established islamist movement in the world of political islam. so truly momentous change on the level of politics. however, i would argue on the level of policy, we hav
. finally, foreign policy. in the debate the other night, it seemed to me there was a difference between a president who seemed extremely angry, seemed sarcastic, and a map who seems ready to be president of the united states. maybe mitt romney has achieved a great deal in his life and has been successful at everything here's done and barack obama never really was prepared to be president of the united states. we took a chance. we took a chance on a man whose resumÉ would not have been approved to be head of any corporation in this country, a man who never ran a business, a man who never ran a military unit, a map who never met a payroll, a man who had no practical experience. sometimes somebody can have talents to be a great executive, never had a chance to show it before. well, he got his chance. you know, we have the highest unemployment for a sustained period since we had since the great depression. he had his chance, and now we got a chance to have a man who actually has been successful in life in a way that converts itself into being an effective executive putting practicality ahe
night, the presidential debate was on foreign policy, andrew's question is about foreign policy. andrew, welcome. please, ask your question. >> [inaudible] >> moderator: okay, thank you. i think we had a mic problem, andrew, but i'll restate the question. andrew said, does current u.s. foreign policy in the middle east undermine our national security? do you agree or disagree? what steps should be taken in foreign policy in the middle east? mr. mourdock? one minute. mourdock: well, our foreign policy is of critical concern, of course, and in the middle east we must always, first and foremost, stand by our great friend, israel, and also we must be making the message that no options can be taken off the table as we look towards a nuclear iran. but to the bigger point of our national security, you know, it was the former head of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mullen, that said the greatest threat to our national security is our own national debt. the fact that we have now spent ourselves into a $16 trillion debt is inexcusable. the fact that we continue to see the debt limit raised and
states, let alone with israel, and more open to iran's message of foreign policy independence. what policy elites here ms., is the islamic republic does not need governments to be more pro-iranian. that's not what they need. they just need these governments to be less pro-american, less pro-israel and more independent. but you often hear in washington in particular that the arab awakening means that iran is going to see. it's only arab allies. or as candidate romney says, evidently without looking at a map, iran's only outlet to the sea. this reflects how it is american elite's, not those sitting in tehran here in denial about basic political trends in the middle east, let alone basic geography. by the islamic republic does not believe that serious bashar al-assad will be overthrown by syrians, the key point is that even a post a sovereign government would not be pro-american or pro-israel. and it may even be less seen on keeping the order with israel quiet. and unless a post assad government were taliban like, serious foreign policy will be just fine for the islamic republic. even
and not the modern culture that feels idaho with dairy cows. we need agriculture policy and foreign policy that fits her to her family farms here in new york. and that's what i'll absolutely be focused on. what i've have spoken to farmers around the district, they're not looking for special treatment, that they want to be treated fairly, not be subjected to unfair competition from the big guys out there in the midwest. >> moderator: congressman gibson, 45 seconds on the farm bill. gibson: he's been tracking it all along. i've been very involved in the process. i've got many amendments into the bill. i'm very proud to say with a dairy security there. dairy farmers are now not even cover the cost of production were going to fix that with the martian were putting in there. i've worked with once a shoe from red hook, beginning farmer leader to make sure we inspire new generations to come to the farm and talk about grants and loans and conservation programs. i am proud to say of the friend of the farmer from the farm bureau and even the pharmacy endorsement. i would tell you earlier this week i did an ev
.s. foreign policy subjective. for the leaders, using these commitments is not only the right thing to do but make sense at a strategic level. >> security has very closely tied together a very basic level we've recognized the health of the country is clearly linked to their prosperity and their productivity and their economic well-being. that is key to the stability. >> here at csis the one to understand the decade teach about the nexus between health and security. the senior men and women in our government and military have grappled with these issues. admiral william fallon, former head of both u.s. pacific and central command, spearheaded military engagement during a 48 year career. >> the military has great cadel lenni to respond. i would say that the military is much better suited to the emergency -- we have a terrific logistics capability. we have accumulated medical and medical related capability. >> we found of the decade of military and health challenges has spread many solutions particularly in the way we provide medical care to those wounded on the battlefield. >> we learn that
diplomacy in the region, and it's part of secretary clinton's economic state agenda. for foreign policy goals, the bottom line is that we need to create more links between the new democracies and american industry. we don't have enough of them. let me conclude by repeating what i said at the outset. there are daunting challenges throughout the region. we need no more proof the that attack in september that took the life of four of our own, and left scars in north africa, but president obama made clear no american violence makes america retreat from the region. we'll bring justice to harm us and our friends, but we will not be detoured from siding with history. we will support our allies, we'll partner with the new democracies to achieve the aspirations of our people. we will be partners. you know, in the last few weeks, i have been reminded of my first trip to north africa. this was early in 2010. i had only been in this job for a few months, and it was before the advent of the arab spring, and i was there to talk to a number of our north african business leaders and educators about pnb
of atrocities the key focus of his administration's foreign policy. this initiative aimed at civilians and holding perpetrators of atrocities accountable. the focus of this initiative is the area and libya. the other initiative come in the second initiative is the open government or airship, which announced in september 2011 but exacerbated in italy. it was launched by governments and ninth society organizations and has grown to include 57 -- now 57 countries and over 300 commitment organizations reaching more than 2 billion teeple, all in just one year. some other countries have already joined her in the process of joining, which i think is a good thing for many arab countries. the partnership is an international airport to improve government performance, encourage participation and enhanced government participation to people and governments throughout the globe. the urban governor partnership of transparency, citizen, protection and accountability. the highlight of the policy of the united state is the memorandum of understanding for corporations that were assigned to the arab league
foreign policy in asia. it is not because of [inaudible] , not because of civilization, but there is a more recent incident where libya [inaudible] it is because of an emerging global war that is being triggered by middle east. now, let me give you a little bit of context. you know, context is sort of like underwear. you don't need a lot of it, but you have to have it first. [laughter] in the past, we thought of the great powers is being the main powers. russia and the u.s. in the past. china, maybe india, and then there was another side, the navy powers or today, the united states. then, there was an american that they called donald fuller. if you put these two ideas together and where the two great powers, the land power in the seapower come together, we call it the [inaudible] the middle east is located in one of the worlds great ones. small states have the ability to shift the power from one large side to the other. simply because it depends on which side they are on or which side they decide to ship two. in the middle east, the old part of that shadowbox wisteria,
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9